Every Learner with a Dream and a Plan

The National Center for College and Career Transitions, or NC3T, has a twofold mission: “Every Learner with a Dream and a Plan, and Every Community with a Capable, Ready Workforce.” The organization works to connect schools, postsecondary institutions, and employers in order to introduce students to the array of options available to them and to help them prepare for the types of opportunities for which they are best suited.

NC3T provides planning, coaching, technical assistance and tools to help community-based leadership teams plan and implement their college-career pathway systems, as well as a range of tools and other services to help schools and colleges provide every student with an opportunity to participate in Career Connected Learning.

NC3T provides planning, coaching, technical assistance and tools to help community-based leadership teams plan and implement their college-career pathway systems.

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Career Connected Learning Planning & Consulting

Through its consulting and coaching services, NC3T helps school districts, communities, regions, and states design and build high quality Pathway Programs and Comprehensive Pathway Systems. We can help you develop your vision, build needed community relationships, and implement your plans.

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Workshops & Keynotes

NC3T expert speakers and professional development consultants are available to keynote events or lead workshops on several topics related to pathways and partnerships.

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Seamless Work Based Learning

Seamless WBL is a web-based program that helps you find partners, create and manage your work-based learning activities, run your advisory board, and report on all activities by educator, school, or partner.

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Latest Posts from CCL In.Sight., the NC3T Blog

Our blog is meant to support local education, business and community leaders in their work by exploring what’s happening in communities and schools across the United States related to Career Connected Learning.

  • Want Greater Well-being and to Avoid a Heart Attack? Pay Attention to Career Fit
    by Hans Meeder January 17, 2019

    Note:  This post is adapted from Chapter 8 of my book, The Power and Promise of Pathways Earnings matter, but not as much as we might think. Something else matters more. Research conducted by researchers at Princeton University, utilizing Gallup data on well-being, discovered there is actually […] Read More →

  • Face to Face With Industry
    by Brett Pawlowski January 15, 2019

    Last week, I was able to go out and lead a couple of workshops on advisory boards and employer engagement, both of which were really fun. At the second, however, something was different than my usual workshops – something I very rarely see when I talk about business-education partnerships: […] Read More →

  • A TIME TO DREAM… AND PLAN?
    by Hans Meeder January 10, 2019

    I recently came across some intriguing survey research conducted by C+R Research that asks young people about their career interests and then compares their responses to the reality of the labor market. The research on youth attitudes shows some big disparities between current youth interests and […] Read More →

  • The Hot and Cold Employment Picture
    by Brett Pawlowski January 8, 2019

    As has been widely reported, the US economy is on fire. We added 312,000 jobs in December alone, and the unemployment rate now sits at just 3.9%, an incredibly low number by historical standards. That basically means that anyone who wants a job can get a job. Right? Or is it more complicated than […] Read More →

  • ENCORE POST: Are There Any More Good Jobs That Pay Without a Bachelor’s Degree?
    by Hans Meeder January 3, 2019

    ORIGINALLY POSTED FEBRUARY 8, 2018 One of the factors that drives the notion that a Bachelor’s Degree is the surest way to success are familiar charts that show average earnings by degree.  For example, one chart shows average earnings of young adults by the degree they have earned, with […] Read More →

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